studio shots

Preparations for Bethany Exhibit

Here some photos of my preparations for the exhibit, "the work behind the Work" at Bethany Lutheran College.  This show focuses on artifacts of creative processes.  If you go to see it, expect to see negative rubber molds, carved wood blocks for printmaking, rubber molds and scale models for sculptures, and preliminary drawings behind the finished works.  There will also be a few finished works, full scale casts, and some previously unseen personal work.  

From the Bethany Website:
Bethany alumnus Jason Jaspersen's Mixed Media art show titled "the work behind the Work: artifacts of creative processes..." will be on display in the Ylvisaker Fine Arts Center Gallery from February 18 to March 28, 2014, with a gallery talk and reception on Thursday, February 27 at 7 p.m.
Gallery hours are 1-9 pm Sunday to Thursday, 1-8 pm Friday and Saturday.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Song of Simeon speed painting video

A short speed painting video showing the underpainting and color blocking for the Song of Simeon (from the St. Mark's Triptych).  Accompanying music "Song of Simeon" by Koine.  See the results on The Making of the St. Mark's Triptych.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Some furniture building

Every now and then there's a gap in my schedule that allows for some work around the house.  I recently finished a few pieces of furniture...

Here's a corner of the house my wife and I are developing little by little.  The sliding door cabinet on the left is new.  The other shelves on the floor are actually intended for the case on the right.  Someday I'll build a box for under the window.
Some older furniture projects from around the house...

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See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Classic Kiln Delivers the Goods!

   My dad and I recently finished the walls in a corner of my studio using cement board and slate.  I've been saving discarded chalkboards for years...This provides me with a nice area for high temp work such as firing a kiln or, someday, welding.  
    So I finally got to fire this awesome vintage kiln (1950's?).  1st test firing released the lovely odor of mouse droppings.  When this kiln was in storage at the Black Lantern studios, it became a mouse apartment complex...After a thorough cleaning now its all been incinerated.  I wish it was warm enough to leave my windows open...

This is kiln predates automatic digital readouts and even gravity-based kiln-sitters.  It does have the awesome dial readout connected to a "thermocouple" temperature probe.  That all means that I need to turn up the heat according to "best practices" and get a feel for the pace of firing.  I was never a super ceramic nerd so this will take some experience.  I've been looking up "ramping" schedules to get an idea of the speed recommended between temperatures.

I heard a frightening POP at around 1300 degrees.  I was sure a piece blew up, but when everything was fine.  It was surprising how little heat emanated from the kiln.  At temperatures approaching 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, the kiln seemed to be insulating well.  Looking in the peephole, I noticed one of the coils doesn't seem to be working.  I do have an extra set, so I should be able to fix that.

I think I love this kiln.  It's got the sturdy charm of a classic pickup, refreshingly low-tech, and just the right internal space to fire 1/4 scale terra cotta figures or life-sized busts.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Video: Making the St. Mark Triptych

This video condenses work done from Feb. 2012 to Dec. 2013 on the triptych for St. Mark Lutheran in Lincoln, Nebraska.  See the project move from idea to reality through sketches, reference photos, painting, gold leaf, and wood working.

Images by Jason Jaspersen.  Music by Koine.  Soli Deo Gloria!

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Packing the St. Mark's triptych

The doors have been taped shut with foam bumpers and 
paper strips to prevent tape adhesive from damaging the finish.

Shipping artwork is a little nerve wracking.  Here's what I've done to prepare the St. Mark's triptych for FedEx transport.

A plastic vapor barrier protects against moisture.
I detached and wrapped the arch separately.  It nests nicely for
a more compact package.  Cardboard corner bumpers protect
vulnerable woodwork.
1/2 inch bubble wrap floats the whole piece on a layer of air
inside the carton.  
The carton is custom built for a snug fit.  
1st layer of carboard.

2nd layer of cardboard provides additional
rigidity and puncture resistance.
See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.