sketchbooks 2011

Phoney Sketches

When I was a kid I wanted a handheld, portable TV.  I thought it would be cool to watch TV on a little screen and not have to be in the same place all the time.  It didn't matter that there were only 6 stations and the reception was iffy.  I didn't ever get that little TV.  But my phone is more than I would have dared to imagine as a kid.  Imagine going back in time and describing a smartphone to yourself as a kid.

"Its a phone, but it looks kind of like a cassette tape.  There's a touch screen, like on Star Trek the Next Generation.  Everyone you know fits in speed dial.  We call them contacts in the future.  You can send emails and text messages, check facebook and tweet from your phone and view any website anywhere.  What's an email?  Oh yeah.  Kind of like passing notes, but there's no paper.  Websites?  *sigh*  Well imagine you could fit a library, museum, and video store in your phone...actually all of them and more.  Yep you can watch TV and you don't need to check the TV guide anymore, you just watch when you want, on your phone.  You can scan barcodes.  It takes pictures AND video.  You can play games like on your Atari.  It's an alarm clock.  Stopwatch. Word Processor.  Calculator. Level.  Flashlight.  Calendar.  To Do List. It has maps that talk to you and tell you when to turn.  You can listen to music, and it even guesses what you want to hear.  You can read books on it.  Check the weather.   Pay your bills.  Oh, and you can make phone calls too.  People still do that.  Yeah, you know when you saw that article about video phones in every house?  People do that in the future too, but its all in the cassette tape-sized pocket phone.   So, if you can wait long enough, you won't miss the crappy little black and white portable TV from K-mart."

I've been trying out the Sketchbook app from Autodesk on my phone.  We've come a long way since MS-DOS.

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Lettering resolved

 Its not any particular font.  I enjoyed playing with nesting the letters to be space-efficient and legible.  Hand drawn and arranged, hand transferred, hand painted, carved, printed.  You can count on me in the post petrol, low tech age that will surely greet our grandchildren.  I just like doing things the old fashioned way.

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Making the Christmas card 2011

Why does it feel like the older I get, the less I know what I'm doing?  Maybe the arrogance is wearing off.  I've made about a dozen Christmas cards.  Someday I'll count the relief blocks I've carved.  


The text is planned to fit into the linoleum strip on the right.  Notice the multiple attempts at composing the text.  Nothing very inspired or appropriate.  I don't quite know what I want to do with the text yet, but I wonder if posting what I have so far will provide some catalyst.  Oddly, posting elements of my process may be becoming part of my process.   
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Sacrament sketches

I'm working on a proposal for 2 works dealing with the sacraments.  These sketches show a very simple approach.  The materials of Baptism and the Lord's Supper are presented in a strait forward still life.  Perhaps the more they look like things in your kitchen, the more relevant they seem to your daily life.  To my thinking, every glass of water, hand washing, and shower can remind one of their baptism.  Every meal, not only bread and wine, can remind one of Jesus.  Of course these daily symbols don't carry the weight of a sacrament.  It's an approach I'm considering for this project.  

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Pentecost banner sketches

I'm working on revising the pentecost banners for Martin Luther College campus.  The Scripture reference is "It was he who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers" (listen)  I want to visually get at the idea of God's call to serve.  It hits us all differently, but comes from the same source.  

Earlier concepts have the dove closer to the head in order to evoke a halo and emphasizes the source of one's holiness.  While I still think its a good idea, it could easily be interpreted as a close encounter with a seagull.

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Thanksgiving day sketches

Marv

Kun

Teddy hunched over an Ipad

Tyler

Maida's Owls (and one octopus)

Teddy still hunched over an Ipad

Ted

Faith

Jenny

Maida's "blind" drawing of me (no peeking at your paper)

My "blind" drawing of Maida

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Devotion sketches

Some sketches based on scriptural topics.  I've started to do these in response to my breakfast devotions.  I've been faithful for over a week, but the results are of varying degrees of finish.  This could become a good way for me to collect ideas for future liturgical projects.  It also makes me think very carefully about the concepts in my devotion text.

Idea for a hanging bronze sculpture.  Our spiritual life as spelunking.  

Simeon

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Recap of St. Croix project conceptual sketches

This post includes a variety of early sketches in which I attempted to interpret the 5 themes of the St. Croix painting project.  It emphasizes the search for visual unity and clear communication.  When a solid design is finally established, it seems so obvious. In my experience there is usually a discouraging stage early on in the process.  I stumbled from one idea to the next with this project for months at a time trying to make content, style, and composition all work in a clear and concise grace.  When a project begins, no one knows for sure what the result will be.  The sketches in this post show a variety possible directions.  Some ideas have grown and survived to the final design while much has been eliminated in favor of clarity.

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Sketches from the WELS worship conference

Yes, I am listening when I draw in a worship service.  In fact, when I look at my sketches I can often recall details of my surroundings years later.  As an artist, a sketch can encapsulate an event in a way that is much more powerful than a photo.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.