progress shots

A timber frame table

Occasionally, I'll do something fun for the house!  This table brings together legs milled from an Ash trunk (thanks to the Krohn family), old barn timbers (thanks to the Flitter family), oak pegs (thanks to my friend Jesse Ellerbroek), a 4x6 Fir beam originally intended to for sculpture (thanks to my brother Dan), and fence posts and a marble slab that predate our time at the house (thanks Victor and Olga Voecks).  3 days in the making, its the kind of thing I can only afford to do in the summer.  I love the flow of a project like this.  Brains, brawn, care, and joy all go into the planning, cutting, fitting, and finishing.  My right arm felt like it was going to fall off from swinging mallets and hatchets.  Big joinery and I are BFF.  
In the end it looks like either classic National park furniture, an Ancient Roman workbench, or a California hippy dining room table.  I look forward to morning coffees and evening s'mores... 

Note:  My dad helped with the milling of the legs years ago and with supervision days ago.  He's always been a helper.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Mary Did You Know teasers

I'm working out a new sand piece for Koine's Tenebrae service.  The song is "Mary Did You Know?"  It clocks in at 2:36 minutes.  My high school students think 5 minutes is a short time to draw their hands!
While thinking about this, Kathe Kollwitz came to mind.  After paging through my book on her prints I'm realizing more and more that I could treat the sand table like a relief print.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Koine Crucifixion sequence

These illustrations are to be used in a new Koine motion graphic.  The idea here is to depict the events and objects surrounding the crucifixion of Jesus.  As the camera moves from scene to scene, only partial views and shadows of figures hint at the gruesome event.  My drawings progress from thumbnail sketches to reference photos, then pencil, ink and digital color.  I then pass them on to members of Koine who will digitally arrange the drawings and create movement with a virtual camera.  In theory the end product, combined with music and in sequence with other songs and visuals will allude to the power and grace of God's solution to humanity's problem.


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See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Making a Speechless Film Festival trophy

It's been an honor (and a blast) to create this trophy for the Speechless Film Festival.  This is the trophy for the winner of the "Made in Minnesota" category.  The base is a beautiful cast iron anchor donated to the festival by Dotson Iron Castings in Mankato, MN.  Maybe I don't get out enough, but I've never seen a sculptural anchor.  
I got back to some of my sculptural roots with this piece.  Musing on how to evoke "Minnesota", I thought timberframing may do the trick.  So I worked with this block of ash I had in the studio.  After planing, cutting, chiseling, burning, and drilling I made some additions to hint at stories or relationships.  The bits of hardware bring the whole thing out of a piece of woodworking and turn it into a mystery.  It's been said that, "an illustration answers questions, but a work of art asks questions."  I love the way films can evoke moods and put one in an imagined situation.  This piece presents itself for interpretation offering only clues, tensions, and evidence.    
 


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See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Baptism of Jesus

I've been working on a set of illustrations for the WELS National Worship Conference.  The images are for a cover and interior imagery for a worship folder to be used at the conference this summer.  They all relate to the Baptism of Jesus.  The main image shown here still needs some work, but I'm excited about the direction of this set.

See more artwork from Jason Jaspersen at jjjaspersen.com, and on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.