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I recently participated in 3 worship services and one concert with The Lutheran Ceili Orchestra.  Here are some visual (silent) records of that collaboration.  Brief explanations are below each video.

"Be Thou My Vision-Slane" (No Sound) Raw video of sand animation. Performed live at St. John Ev. Lutheran Church Saturday, May 16, 2015 with The Lutheran Ceili Orchestra. The imagery here relays an event from the life of St. Patrick. A Pagan holiday happened to fall on the same day as Easter one year. The king of Ireland, a committed pagan, declared that only pagans could celebrate and any Christian Easter celebration would come to a bloody end. So Patrick and his congregation climbed Slane hill and lit a huge bonfire in defiance. The king sent his soldiers to kill them. The soldiers reportedly only saw a herd of deer around the bonfire.

Rehearsal for unused sequence. Prepared for The Lutheran Ceili Orchestra's rendition of the hymn "The King of Love My Shepherd Is". The author of this hymn, Columba, allegedly pulled an all-nighter making a hand-written copy of a valuable illuminated manuscript. Naturally, this started a war and he was banished to Scotland. He proceeded to evangelize and plant seeds of faith in that part of the world. Some believe Columba was the man who made the famous Book of Kells.

"Procession to the Crosss/Dream of the Rood" (No Sound) Raw video of sand animation. Performed live at St. John Ev. Lutheran Church Saturday, May 16, 2015 with The Lutheran Ceili Orchestra.

This sequence spans two stories of ancient Irish Christianity. It begins with the Procession to the Cross. The iconic stone Irish crosses often have Biblical imagery carved into them. This was one means of keeping the teachings of Christianity fresh in the minds of an illiterate population. Irish congregations used to gather for midnight vespers services around the outdoor cross for a prayer or hymn and then proceed into the church. The second part of this sequence interprets a poem inscribed on one of the Celtic crosses. The anonymous poem is known as the Dream of the Rood. It is written from a first person perspective of a tree. The tree recalls being cut down and shaped. It recalls seeing the way men similarly used and abused their maker. The tree understood the tremendous weight it held with Jesus nailed to it. I decided a view from behind the cross would emphasize this close relationship.