I started construction on some stacking figures.  A vertical orientation implies those who support and those who benefit from that support.  Every expression is a result of the situation that supports it.  For example:

  My students are a result of their high school.  The high school I teach at is a result of the congregations and individuals who support with their prayers and gifts.  They support the school because it lines up with their shared Lutheran heritage.  The Lutheran belief system is built on a specific understanding of the Bible.  The Bible carries the very Word of God.  God's Word carries his love.  My ministry is to communicate that love to my students...

Another example:

A work of art is a result of a system of expression such as "Impressionism" or "Jazz".  Systems of expression are built on systems of thought or feeling exemplified by ideas such as "Order", "Carpe Deim", or "Git 'er dun".  Systems of thought or feeling come from one's basic priorities such as survival, leisure, community, legacy...  

If surviving the winter is a real concern, various sequences of thoughts, words, and actions will follow to cope.  If community is a priority, there will be corresponding results extending through etiquette, formalities, and networks of acquaintance.  If religious faithfulness is one's basic priority, it would not be surprising to see one's studies, activities, writings, and daily speech all affected.

I've been ruminating on this since Richard gave me his printout of the Louis Sullivan quote on basic systems of living.  I realize now that I've had a fascination with paradigms for years.  I love to think about the assumptions behind thoughts, words, and actions.  I guess it's just an extension of the toddler question, "WHY?"  

David Kolb's learning cycle has commonalities here.  Maybe I'm forcing this, but synthesis is one of my favorite challenges.  His cycle of learning proceeds from Experience to Reflection to Conception to Planning (for the next Experience).  I see a similar pattern of one thing depending on the previous.  The interesting thing with Kolb's cycle is that it leads into further cycles.  If this sculpture were to represent the ongoing sequence of one answer leading to more questions, this would grow and grow and grow.  For now it's 2 little figures.